The Concordance Cosmology
The current standard model of cosmology is known as the "Concordance Cosmology" and is derived from landmark observations of supernovae and the CMB made during the late 1990s. In the Concordance Cosmology, the Universe consists of 70% dark energy, 25% dark matter and 5% ordinary matter. Prior to these observations, cosmologists expected the dark energy fraction (Λ) to be zero; indeed, in the 1980s, Cambridge cosmologist Dr. Stephen Hawking described l as the constant of nature most accurately measured to be zero, since the leading theories of ultra-high energy physics predicted the fraction to be either zero or 10-120.
Figure 5 . Constraints on the fractional contribution of dark energy (Λ) and all forms of matter (m) to the critical density of the Universe. Together these complementary measurements drove the adoption of the so-called Concordance Cosmology, with approximately 70% dark energy, 25% dark matter, and 5% ordinary matter. This illustrates the need for complementary experiments in cosmology.
The concordance is the intersection of the constraints imposed by each of the measurements individually and can be seen in the green-shaded area in figure 5. This figure illustrates constraints on the fractional contribution of dark energy (Λ) and all forms of matter (m) to the critical density of the Universe (Ωtotal = 1) from:
    type Ia supernova, tracing the dynamics of the Universe and hence (ΩΛ - Ωm)

    the CMB, tracing the geometry of the Universe and hence (ΩΛ + Ωm)